Gidoni, Elsa Mandelstamm

Elsa Mandelstamm Gidoni

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Dates of Birth and Death

March 12, 1901-April 19, 1978

Birthplace

Riga, Latvia

Education

  • Imperial Academy of Arts, St. Petersburg
  • Berlin Technical University (no degree)

Years of practice

1928–1967 (estimated)

Affiliations/Firms

  • Before 1928 worked in architectural offices in Berlin.
  • 1928-33 operated her own office for interior design under the name Elsa Gidoni-Mandelstamm at 7 Landshuter Street in Berlin-Schöneberg.
  • 1933-38 operated her own office in Tel Aviv under the name Elsa Gidoni.
  • 1938-39 worked on the General Motors “Futurama” exhibit, designed by Norman Bel Geddes, at the 1939 New York World’s Fair.
  • Also worked for: Mayer and Whittlesey, Architects, New York
  • Fort Greene Housing Project, New York City Housing Authority
  • Antonin Raymond, New Hope, PA 1942-45 Fellheimer and Wagner, New York City
  • 1946-67 Kahn and Jacobs, New York City

Professional organizations

  • American Institute of Architects

Major projects

  • Berlin: Design for a Modern Dining Room Cabinet, Berlin, c. 1930 (produced by the Deutsche Werkstätten Hellerau)
  • Tel Aviv, Levant Fair, Galina Café-Restaurant, 1934 (with Shlomo Ginsburg and Genia Averbuch)
  • Tel Aviv, Levant Fair, Swedish Pavilion, 1934
  • Tel Aviv, Levant Fair, Women’s International Zionist Organization (WIZO) Pavilion, 1934
  • Tel Aviv, WIZO House, 8 Bet Hashoeva (Water Drawing) Lane, 1935 (with E. Zeisler, engineer)
  • Tel Aviv, House of the Women Pioneers Beit Halutzot, competition 1935; built King George Street, Tel Aviv, 1936 (with E. Zeisler, engineer)
  • Nahalat Yitzhak (near Tel Aviv), Domestic Science School, Women’s International Zionist Organization (WIZO), competition 1934 (first prize); built 1935 (with E. Zeisler, engineer)
  • Tel Aviv, Apartment Building, 12 Reines Street, 1936 (with E. Zeisler, engineer)
  • Dormitories on a Women’s Collective Farm, Ajanoth, 1937 United States
  • New York City, New York, Library and Exhibition Hall, Council for Pan-American Democracy, 23 West 26th Street, New York City, New York, 1946
  • Jewish Vacation Association, Camp competition, 1946
  • House design for General Panel Corporation, c. 1947
  • New Rochelle, New York, House for a Dr. and Mrs. M. Lenz, 1947 Ballston, Virginia, Hecht Company Department Store (Parkington), 1959
  • Boston, Massachusetts, Travelers Insurance Company, corner of High and Pearl Streets, c. 1960
  • Norwalk Harbour, Connecticut, Manresa Island Plant, Connecticut Light and Power Company, c.1960. United Engineers and Constructors, Inc. of Philadelphia collaborated in the plant design.
  • NB: Gidoni’s portfolio of drawings at the Library of Congress includes numerous other U.S. projects that have not yet been properly identified.
  • Exhibitions: 1934, Levant Fair, Tel Aviv
  • 1939, World’s Fair, New York

Awards, honors and press

  • Elsa Gidoni Papers, PR 13 CN 1988:252 and ADE - UNIT 2227, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Cornell University, Ithaca, NY The American Institute of Architects Archives, Washington, D.C. (membership file and correspondence)
  • First Prize, House of Women Pioneers Beit Halutzot, invited competition, 1935; built (with E. Zeisler, engineer) on King George Street, Tel Aviv, 1936
  • First Prize, Beit Shalva (House of Calm) invited competition, nursing home, Ramot Ha’shavim (north of Tel Aviv), 1938; building not constructed

Location of architect’s archive

Elsa Gidoni Papers, PR 13 CN 1988:252 and ADE - UNIT 2227, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Cornell University, Ithaca, NY The American Institute of Architects Archives, Washington, D.C. (membership file and correspondence)

Related websites


Keywords

Berlin, Germany, Israel, New York, New York City, Tel Aviv

View Elsa Mandelstamm Gidoni‘s profile on the Pioneering Women website

Biography

Written by Despina Stratigakos, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Early Life and Education

Elsa Gidoni (1899–1978; née Mandelstamm) was a Berlin-based architect who was among those who fled Nazi persecution and helped to bring European modernism to Palestine and the United States. She was born in Riga, Latvia, in 1899. Her family was part of the large Jewish community that existed in Riga before the Second World War. Her father, Paul, was a doctor, her mother, Minna, a pianist.[1] Educated, middle-class Jewish families in Europe tended to hold liberal attitudes toward their daughters’ educations, permitting them to study “masculine” professions, including architecture.[2] Elsa attended the Academy of Arts in St. Petersburg in Russia and received further training at the Berlin Technical University, but did not graduate with a degree. Her student records have yet to be located, leaving questions about her instructors and coursework.

Career in Architecture

Elsa Gidoni, ca. 1960.
Elsa Gidoni, ca. 1960.
Mandelstamm began to earn her living at the drafting board from the age of sixteen. In later years, she claimed that “she literally ‘grew up’ at the drafting board, getting her training in spurts as she could.”[3] In 1928, she opened an office for interior design under the name Elsa Gidoni-Mandelstamm at 7 Landshuter Street in the Schöneberg district of Berlin. In 1933, when Adolf Hitler seized power, her Jewish background put her at peril. She later recalled that “she had a skill—‘ten fingers and a pencil’—a mother, and a younger sister to support, nobody anywhere in the world to go to, and only the threat of destruction at their heels.”[4]In considering the countries to which she might emigrate, she later stated that it was important to her to be able to “follow a full professional and independent career as a woman.” Initially she planned to move to England, but at the suggestion of a friend, she went instead to Palestine where, she had heard, new cities were being constructed and people with technical skills were needed.[5]

Gidoni thus resettled in Tel Aviv, where she opened her own architecture office, which she maintained from 1933 to 1938. Both her design skills and the vision of a modern architecture that she had brought with her from Berlin were in demand. Tel Aviv was booming. In 1934, the city’s engineering department had approved building plans representing $12,500,000 in construction costs.[6] (By way of comparison, that amount surpassed the entire municipal budget for Yonkers, New York, that same year.[7]) Not only was the city growing rapidly, but it was also developing a new style.

Elsa Gidoni, café-restaurant at the Levant Fair, Tel Aviv, 1934. © Library of Congress
Elsa Gidoni, café-restaurant at the Levant Fair, Tel Aviv, 1934. © Library of Congress

The new architecture was highly visible at the 1934 Levant Fair in Tel Aviv, an international exhibition that attracted dozens of participating countries. Gidoni designed three buildings for the fair in a modernist style: the Galina Café-Restaurant (with Shlomo Ginsburg and Genia Averbuch), the Swedish Pavilion, and the Women’s International Zionist Organization Pavilion. Gidoni also entered, and won, architectural competitions. Within a few years of her arrival (1933), she had added apartment houses, a school, a hostel, and agricultural buildings to her list of built projects. Their modernism earned her international recognition as part of a new school of architecture in Palestine.

Gidoni’s plans were praised for being both practical and attentive to their users’ comfort. For example, the WIZO Domestic Science School near Tel Aviv (1935) integrated educational, administrative, and residential spaces for students and teachers in an L-shaped, two-story structure. Living accommodations on the top floor were arranged to give access to outdoor space. In keeping with the political commitment of many modernist architects, Gidoni emphasized that her buildings were not luxurious.[8] Despite her professional success, the growing political unrest and violence under the British Mandate led her to decide to emigrate once more, this time to the United States.[9] It was a familiar destination: members of Gidoni’s family had already immigrated to the United States, and she had made her first visit in 1922, staying with an aunt in Brooklyn.[10]

Elsa Gidoni, apartment house, Tel Aviv, 1937. © Library of Congress
Elsa Gidoni, apartment house, Tel Aviv, 1937. © Library of Congress
Elsa Gidoni, Research Library and Exhibition Hall in the Council for Pan-American Democracy Building, 23 West 26th Street, New York, 1946. © Library of Congress
Elsa Gidoni, Research Library and Exhibition Hall in the Council for Pan-American Democracy Building, 23 West 26th Street, New York, 1946. © Library of Congress


In May 1938, Gidoni arrived in New York, where she struggled to find work. Her first job was working for Norman Bel Geddes on General Motors’s Futurama exhibit at the 1939 World’s Fair. She designed small homes and other building types used for the model.[11] During the war years, she was employed by Fellheimer and Wagner, the New York architectural firm known for its railroad stations in Beaux-Arts and art deco styles. After the war, she joined the highly successful New York architectural firm of Kahn and Jacobs, where she worked as the project designer on numerous large-scale commissions. These included the sixteen-story building of the Travelers Insurance Company in Boston and a new power plant for the Connecticut Light and Power Company in Norwalk Harbor. Gidoni enjoyed the challenges of designing major buildings and recognized the responsibilities involved, saying that “in this area of specialization, an architect’s concept may change the whole character of a neighborhood, and affect the lives of hundreds of people.”[12] Although Gidoni viewed her design contributions in terms of the conscientious professional, Robert Jacobs, in an interview given near the end of his life, described her as “brilliant.”[13]

Elsa Gidoni, house designed for General Panel Corporation, ca. 1947. © Library of Congress
Elsa Gidoni, house designed for General Panel Corporation, ca. 1947. © Library of Congress
In 1960, in response to a reporter’s question, Gidoni dismissed the idea of a uniquely feminine touch in architecture as absurd. “It just doesn’t exist—there is no distinction,” she stated. “I am an architect and my being a woman has no bearing on my position.” She continued, “When you mention ‘the woman’s touch,’ aren’t there so many million women in the United States—and hasn’t each and every one her own individual touch or idea?” Yet despite her insistence, the reporter (or her editor) seems not to have heard her, since the title of the article emphasized Gidoni’s “quiet woman’s quiet touch.”[14]In 1943, Gidoni became one of the very few women members of the American Institute of Architects. By 1960, when she was interviewed by The New York Times, the numbers had not improved greatly. That year, the AIA had 13,000 members nationwide, but only a hundred of them were women. In the New York chapter, to which Gidoni belonged, there were only twelve female members who were fully accredited as licensed architects. The reporter concluded that “marriage, unless to another architect, often upsets their careers.”[15]

As she had done once before in Tel Aviv, Gidoni helped to introduce new audiences to radical ideas about architecture that had developed in Europe. Along with other émigré architects, she designed industrial buildings, department stores, office buildings, and houses in a modernist style. The term “style” is misleading, however, for Gidoni and other émigrés were concerned with a far more profound transformation. Advocating mass social reform through architecture, the modern movement in Europe had sought to industrialize building construction and promoted experimentation with new materials and technologies. Around 1947, Gidoni was among a select group of émigré architects, including Walter Gropius and Richard Neutra, who were asked to create modular house designs using prefabricated panels that could be built cheaply and quickly.[16] While historians have documented the contributions of European male architects to the growth of modernism in the United States, little has been written about their female counterparts, who were also part of this influential wave.[17]After fifty years at the drafting table, Gidoni retired from architectural practice in 1967. She died on April 19, 1978, and is interred at Hillside Memorial Park in Culver City, California.

Notes

1  Information from Edina Meyer-Maril, emails to the author, September 9 and 20, 2014. The author is grateful to Dr. Meyer-Maril for generously sharing her research.

2  Despina Stratigakos, “‘I Myself Want to Build’: Women, Architectural Education and the Integration of Germany’s Technical Colleges,” Paedagogica Historica 43, no. 6 (2007): 727–56.

3  Marilyn Hoffman, “Key Skills Linked,” Christian Science Monitor, April 27, 1960.

4  Ibid.

5  Ibid.

6  “Tel Aviv Reveals Figures on Growth,” Jewish Daily Bulletin, February 1, 1935.

7  “Tax Rise of 68 Cents Indicated in Yonkers: Tentative $12,000,000 Budget Adopted by Estimate Board Sets Levy at $3.79,” New York Times, January 15, 1934.

8  Myra Warhaftig, They Laid the Foundation: Lives and Works of German-Speaking Jewish Architects in Palestine, 1918–1948, trans. Andrea Lerner (Berlin: Wasmuth, 2007), 320–21.

9  Hoffman, “Key Skills Linked.”

10  Elsa Mandelstamm, Passenger Record, The Statue of Liberty–Ellis Island Foundation; Elsa Gidoni, Passenger Record, The Statue of Liberty–Ellis Island Foundation.

11  Elsa Gidoni, “So Now They Are Sending Me Female Architects!” Case file for PR 13 CN 1988:252, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

12  Hoffman, “Key Skills Linked.”

13  Robert Jacobs, interview with Jewel Stern, November 5, 1989. The author is grateful to John Stuart for this reference.

14  Mary King, “There’s a Quiet Woman’s Quiet Touch in the Travelers Insurance Building,” Daily Boston Globe, April 3, 1960.

15  Thomas W. Ennis, “Women Gain Role in Architecture,” New York Times, March 13, 1960.

16  “The Industrialized House,” Architectural Forum 86, no. 2 (1947): 115–20. 17  Despina Stratigakos, “Reconstructing a Lost History: Exiled Jewish Women Architects in America,” Aufbau 68, no. 22 (2002): 14.

Bibliography

Writings by Elsa Gidoni

“So Now They Are Sending Me Female Architects!” Ten-page unpublished autobiographical manuscript about Gidoni’s search for work as an architect in New York City in 1938 and her work on General Motors’s Futurama exhibit at the 1939 New York World’s Fair. Case file for PR 13 CN 1988:252, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

Writings about Elsa Gidoni (in chronological order):

Haus Hof Garten 34 (1930): 412.

Frau und Gegenwart 28, no. 5 (1932): 132.

“WIZO Domestic Science School: Building Plan Accepted.” Palestinian Post, July 18, 1934.

Habinyan Bamisrach Hakarov 1, Tel Aviv (December 1934): 13.

“Tel Aviv Reveals Figures on Growth.” Jewish Daily Bulletin, February 1, 1935.

“Palestine and the New Architecture.” Architectural Forum 65, no. 6 (1936): 553.

Habinyan Bamisrach Hakarov 3, Tel Aviv (August 1935): 10.

Habinyan Bamisrach Hakarov 8, Tel Aviv (August 1936): 12.

Habinyan Bamisrach Hakarov 9/10, Tel Aviv (November 1936): 10.

“Die WIZO-Haushaltungsschule bei Tel-Aviv.” Jüdische Rundschau, no. 25 (1936).

“Accident at Egged Garage.” Palestinian Post, May 4, 1937.

Habinyan 1, Tel Aviv (August 1937): 46 ff.

“Rebuilding the Mother-Craft Centre.” Palestinian Post, November 8, 1937.

Schiffman, Y. “The New Palestine.” Architectural Review 84, no. 503 (1938): 142–54.

“Education and Health.” Architectural Forum 85, no. 4 (1946): 126–27.

“The Industrialized House.” Architectural Forum 86, no. 2 (1947): 115–20.

“A Thousand Women in Architecture: Part I.” Architectural Record 103, no. 3 (1948): 105–13.

Ennis, Thomas W. “Women Gain Role in Architecture.” New York Times, March 13, 1960.

King, Mary. “There’s a Quiet Woman’s Quiet Touch in the Travelers Insurance Building.” Daily Boston Globe, April 3, 1960.

Hoffman, Marilyn. “Key Skills Linked.” Christian Science Monitor, April 27, 1960.

Stevens, Mary Otis. “Struggle for Place: Women in Architecture: 1920–1960.” In Women in American Architecture: A Historic and Contemporary Perspective, edited by Susana Torre. New York: Whitney Library of Design, 1977.

Stratigakos, Despina. “Reconstructing a Lost History: Exiled Jewish Women Architects in America.” Aufbau 68, no. 22 (2002): 14.

Bauer, Corinna Isabel. “Elsa Gidoni.” Bauhaus und Tessenow-Schülerinnen: Genderaspekte im Spannungsverhältnis von Tradition und Moderne. Dissertation, Universität Kassel, 2003, 351–52. http://kobra.bibliothek.uni-kassel.de/bitstream/urn:nbn:de:hebis:34-2010090234467/7/DissertationCorinnaIsabelBauer.pdf

Meyer-Maril, Edina. “Women Architects Build the Land.” In Woman Artists in Israel 1920–1970, edited by Ruth Markus. Tel Aviv: Hakibbutz Hameuchad, 2008. In Hebrew.

Warhaftig, Myra. They Laid the Foundation: Lives and Works of German-Speaking Jewish Architects in Palestine, 1918–1948. Translated by Andrea Lerner. Berlin: Wasmuth, 2007.

Davidi, Sigal. The Feminine Presence in Israeli Architecture. Tel Aviv: Israel Association of United Architects, 2009. In Hebrew.

Meyer-Maril, Edina. “Architects in Palestine: 1920–1948.” Jewish Women: A Comprehensive Historical Encyclopedia. March 1, 2009. http://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/architects-in-palestine-1920-1948

Businger, Susanne. “Deutschsprachige Architektinnen im Exil zur Zeit des Nationalsozialismus: Anmerkungen zu einem nahezu unerforschten Gebiet.” Zwischenwelt: Literatur, Widerstand, Exil 28, nos. 1–2 (2011): 34–38.

Dar, Raquel. “Women’s Footprints in the Sands of Tel Aviv.” WIZO Review, no. 326 (Spring/Summer 2011): 26–27.